A diary of a homeworker during the lockdown

Confession on what goes on behind the closed door

MORNING

7:15 AM. I jump out of my bed to switch off the alarm. The phone display tells me it’s the 3rd of April. I’m approaching the end of my fourth week of self-isolation, you know, since the Earth has started shutting down.

7:30 AM. As I don’t have to rush for a train, I fight the urge to nap a little longer. In my experience, a little longer might turn into an additional hour. I’d better get up and make myself some fresh coffee.

8:00 AM. Stopover in the bathroom to wash my face. I spend thirty seconds looking at myself in the mirror. So far, I haven’t started talking to the mirror nor walls, so this quarantine period is not so bad.

8:15 AM. Great! I still have some time left before jumping on the morning calls and stand-ups. I’d better use it to enjoy the coffee in a living room full of the morning sun. I check out the daily news. I bet not much has changed. Efforts to flatten the curve, part of the population complaining about being on lockdown, another part of the community ignoring the rules and acting like heroes who cannot get sick, inevitable economic decline, increasing unemployment rates. Even more mass surveillance on the horizon? Sounds peachy, not.

8:20 AM. Ah! A positive side to all the news, air pollution is cleaning up. Who knows for how long. Okay, I should probably adopt a little bit of digital minimalism in my life, not only because the majority of all online newspaper homepages display only negative news. Where have all the positive news gone?

8:45 AM. Let’s try to dress up for working from home.

9:00 AM. I receive yet another pandemic-related video. It’s a grandpa plowing the garden and a granny planting toilet paper rolls in line. It’s hysterical. I laugh a lot. Toilet paper hoarders seem to be forgetting it’s a runny nose, not a runny butt they will experience. But well, who knows. Maybe they just need to feel in control [apparently, this is it, or at least it’s mentioned in a psychology-related article I read in New Yorker].

10:00 AM. First, stand up, kicks off. While muted on the call, I’m thinking, would it be utterly unacceptable if I go and put my tea kettle on and eat late breakfast. With this work from home, I finally have time to make freshly-baked croissants.

11:15 AM. Is this how all the wild animals in captivity feel? Wake up, eat, walk around your square cage, sleep and repeat? It’s a kind of a funny thing, isn’t it? Within weeks, the Earth turned into a zoo. Countries are putting their citizens on lockdown to protect and slow-down this snowballing disaster. Some on less strict, I guess that could be an equivalent of a safari. You know, you can still go for a run. Some countries apply more stringent rules. That probably sounds more like a small zoo cage your next exotic animal will be trapped in, soon. You know to preserve their species or ‘research.’ We impose the living restrictions on other species ever so often, so why we can’t bear to stay put and at home for a little while? Not only to slow down the spread but to protect others as well.

11:20 PM, Nevermind, back to work.

AFTERNOON

12:50 PM. Lunchtime is here. Every opportunity to stretch and cook is welcome. The dilemma of health or unhealthy lunch option is real.

1: 30 PM. The after-lunch dip is approaching — the dreading thought of a sofa, which is only a few metres away. Nah, I’ll better use this time to finish an online course I started. When would be a better time to develop new skills if not now.

2:00 PM. I receive another pandemic-related video. This one is more of dark humour — abrupt chaos type. Again, I laugh hysterically while at the same time regret it instantly. You know, karma is b****. I like dark humour more than I thought. Okay, enough. I don’t want to go down the gif rabbit hole.

2:30 PM. A virtual coffee break with a colleague. It’s nice to see a familiar face. We share what’s new, few tips on new books or virtual games. I’m honestly sick of Netflix. Who the hell wants to binge through their life? (a few hours later) Dammit, Community is on! Nevermind.

2:50 PM. I am going through my mailbox, trying to plan out the sprint for next week. It’s going to be busy. Every blog wants a coronavirus-related section. I just hope our web hosts and internet providers will survive this period. I read Netlfix is lowering the streaming quality to offload some network pressure. Again, it could be a hoax. Who knows these days.

3:30 PM. Trying to stay focus is working out — most of the time.

4:00 PM. Officially welcome to a two-hour call window, yay. I just need to remember to mute the mic before going to the loo.

5:10 PM. I was thinking about the non-virus related topic for the next post. Also, wonder, will Medium curators accept this one?

5:30 PM. Is it only me or my face is glued to the computer screen more than in actual work?

EVENING

6:30 PM. Shutting down my laptop, closing my eyes for a while. They deserve a bit of rest. I consider myself to be a lucky duck. One of the advantages of living close to a park and further away from the city center, you won’t face many people during your walk. At least one hour on the fresh air will help.

7:05 PM. Miss real face-to-face contact. Well, virtual coffees this weekend will have to do the job. Better be safe than sorry.

7:30 PM. My parents were forced to advanced technologically in a brief period. We are starting our WhatsApp call. For now, they are okay.

8:00 PM. Which part of the apartment will I work from tomorrow?

I enjoy researching different topics, occasionally, I’ll turn them into articles.

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